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River Conditions

Local rivers we frequent

Green River

946 cfs

Provo River

129 cfs

Weber River

28 cfs

NORTHERN UTAH REPORTS 

Updated: May 21st, 2024

By: Nick Teynor

 

*RIVER FLOW UPDATE: We just heard that the Green River below Flaming Gorge Reservoir is set to raise flows for the "Spring Flush" starting May 22nd. Flows are forecasted to go up to 6,600 CFS by May 23rd, and will stay at that level through the weekend and Memorial Day. This will definitely have an impact on the fishing, so if you're looking to head out, I'd wait for a day or two to let the fish settle in their new locations. The Middle and the Lower Provo saw significant increase in flows over the past couple of weeks. The Middle Provo went from 850 CFS-646 CFS, and the Lower Provo is flowing between 800-900 CFS. Both Deer Creek and Jordanelle Reservoirs are at or nearing full capacity, so it is only a matter of time before the big flush happens. When it does, fishing on the local tailwaters will be done for a moment. From here on out, I would recommend not trying to cross at these flows, as it is not safe, and the fish will be much closer to the river banks anyway.  The Weber below Echo also rose in flows, and is now 651 CFS, which is a non-crossable flow for this stretch of river. Again, I cannot stress how important it is to check the river gauges before you head out, and we've provided links for you in the report.*

 

Hello All,

As mentioned above, run-off has come to the Wasatch Front again. With this increase in flows, fishing a streamer or nymphing along the rivers edge with sow bugs, scuds, aquatic worms, caddis larva, attractor nymphs, and Baetis nymphs can work when there are no fish rising, and focusing on fishing during the warmest/most comfortable part of the day will help tilt the odds a little more in your favor. We were just starting to see some Skwala stoneflies starting hatch, so if it were me, I'd be working the slow seams and river edges with a Skwala dry-dropper rig, and covering a lot of ground. Weather for the next week or so seems to warming, which could potentially get the Mother's Day Caddis hatch going on streams that are still fishable, so I'd also recommend packing your small, dark caddis emergers and dries (#16-#18) with you just in case.

Spring is here, and that means there will be more and more river traffic out there. In order to avoid bad river etiquette, it's important to know the basic ins an outs of how to interact with each other on the water. The folks over at Redington Fly Gear have a nice little video on the subject.

 

Check these gauges for updates on water levels!

1) Central Utah Water Conservancy District

2) USGS Streamflow

 

Fishing Conditions Summary

 

Middle Provo:

As of today, the Middle Provo is currently 648 CFS out of Jordanelle Reservoir, and 625 CFS at River Road Bridge. At this flow, the river is only fishable in the side channels or slow moving water along the rivers edge. This will most likely put an end to the dry fly fishing for a while, but fishing a streamer or nymphing along the rivers edge with sow bugs, scuds, aquatic worms, caddis larva, attractor nymphs, Baetis nymphs can work, and fishing a Skwala Stonefly/Chubby Chernobyl dry-dropper rig could potentially move a fish or two.  

 

Lower Provo:

The Lower's flow is currently 800 CFS out of Deer Creek. This is a very tough flow to fish if you are on foot, so if you do go fish the Lower make sure to be smart, and don't take any unnecessary risks. In short, DON'T get in the water above your ankles! Nymphing with Sow Bugs and scuds (#14-#18), Baetis nymphs (#18-#20), small attractor nymphs such as Perdigons, Caddis Larva, and worm patterns would be what I would use on the Lower Provo if there is nothing hatching. Just like the Middle Provo, fishing a dry-dropper rig up the rivers edges can be a good way to cover the ground, or fishing a streamer low and slow can be effective when nothing else seems to be moving fish.

 

Weber River:

The Weber River between Rockport and Echo reservoirs is now flowing at 177 CFS at Wanship, and 268 CFS at Coalville. This is a pushy, but fishable flow for this stretch of the Weber, and nymphing and streamer fishing are good techniques to try if no Midges, Blue Wing Olives, or Mother's Day Caddis are hatching. Flows out of Echo Reservoir to Henefer are now currently at 658 CFS. Your fly selection for the Weber between Rockport and Echo Reservoirs will be similar the Middle and Lower Provo. While the hatches and dry fly fishing on the Weber can be inconsistent, I'd definitely still bring Midge, B.W.O., and Mother's Day Caddis dry flies and emergers in case you run into a hatch on the Middle Weber.

 

Green River Below Flaming Gorge:

As of right now, the flows on the Green below Flaming Gorge are flowing at/around 1,000-1,500 CFSWe just got the word that the Green River below Flaming Gorge Reservoir is set to raise flows for the "Spring Flush" starting May 22nd. Flows are forecasted to go up to 6,600 CFS by May 23rd, and will stay at that level through the weekend and past Memorial Day. This will definitely have an impact on the fishing, so if you're looking to head out, I'd wait for a day or two to let the fish settle in their new locations. 

If you're heading to the Green I'd make sure to bring Midge and B.W.O. nymphs and dries (#16-#22), Black Flying Ant patterns (#14-#16), and attractor dry fly patterns like a Para. Cricket (#14-#16), Peacock PMX (#14-#16), Parachute Adams (#12-#20), Purple Rooster/Purple Hazes (#14-#18). Nymphing and/or Dry-Dropper fishing with attractor nymphs like "Frenchies", Perdigons, olive or tan scuds, Zebra Midges, and small worm patterns can work well if there are no signs of fish feeding off of the surface. If it is super windy, cloudy, not much surface activity, etc.-fishing a streamer can be effective. 

 

Other Waters:

Strawberry and Scofield Reservoirs "Ice-Off" has come and gone, but don't worry or be too bummed if you missed it. The fish will look to hang around in the shallows for the next couple of weeks, and fishing from the shore can still be good. Taking a drive to check out some of the lower elevation Uinta reservoirs wouldn't be a bad idea, or head south to see what lake and reservoirs are open and fishing in Southern Utah. It's that time of year to be willing to explore and get creative with your fishing options. 

 

Fishing Tip(s):

My go to leader(s) for fishing the local tailwaters during this time of year are 7.5' 2X leaders and tippet for fishing streamers, 7.5'-9' 4X leaders for fishing dries, dry-droppers, light nymph rigs, and 4X-6X tippets. My choice of tippet off of my leader is based on whatever size of fly I need to throw. This simple leader/tippet system allows me to adjust to whatever fishing conditions I encounter, and simplify what I need to take with me fishing. The only other tips I can offer are the following: Be prepared for dynamic weather changes, check the river flows before you head out, and make sure you respect each others space when out on the water!!!

 

FLY RECOMMENDATIONS:

 

Buckskin Nymph (#20-#22)

Zebra Midges (#16-#22)

Juju Baetis (#18-#22)

Pheasant Tail Nymphs (#18-#22)

Cased / Un-Cased Caddis Larva (#16-#18)

Prince Nymphs (#12)

Blowtorch (#16)

Olive Graphic Caddis (#16)

Mother Shuckers (#22,#24)

Turkey Baetis (#20-#22)

401K Baetis Dun (#20)

Purple Rooster (#14-#18)

Para. Adams (#12-#18, #22-#26)

Olive X-Caddis (#16-#18)

Peacock Caddis (#16)

Olive Missing Link (#16-#18)

Little Olive Skwala Stone (#12)

Purple or Peacock Chubby Chernobyl (#12-#14)

Leeches (#8#-#10)

Sow Bugs (#16,#18)

Soft Hackle Sow Bugs (#16, #20)

San Juan Worms (#12-#16)

Gummy Worms (#12)